SUBH MANGAL ZYADA SAVDHAN

Yesterday , while watching the trailer of Subh Mangal Zyada Savdhan trailer something not short of a revelation dawn on me. I was watching a trailer of a gay love story set in Hindi heartland ( cow belt ) while living under a fascist regime. Wow…what? Really?. Then as I started scrolling down to the comment section it got worse. Almost all of the comments were enthusiastic about the concept and surprisingly those who sneered were heavily trolled. But how can this happen during a Nazisque administration , weren’t the homosexuals sent to concentration camps in droves under Hitler?. This is were the English language media narrative about the ruling dispension at the centre starts to unravel.

The problem starts with the liberal belief that globalization is a done deal and hence human beings around the world now constitute a monolith. This generalisation is not restricted to the present but they also see parallels from the past to what is happening today. This lopsided worldview , which clouds their judgement stems from the lack of exposure to the real world outside their echo chambers. Let’s analyse this argument with the prime example of BJP and the duo who call the shots at the centre.

Firstly let us look at the statement – “BJP is a right wing communal party” . Now let us dissect the statement. There is the allegation of being right wing and there is that of being communal. BJP is a nationalist party that prides itself in India’s past glory. Hinduism being the indigeneous religion of the land , it would be natural for them to identify themselves with it. Together with this there is a staunch anti Islamic bias. This stems from the belief that the glorious Indian civilisation started to decline with the Islamic conquest and the ravages it brought with it culminated with the partition of Bharat Mata. For the party and its supporters the fight against Islam is the fight for survival and it is ethical to take any route to success including riots. So BJP is communal.

Now let us look into the right wing aspect of BJP. Though Hinduism is the basis of the party ideology , it cannot be called right wing conservatism. Here is where the anglicised journalists starts to go astray. Hinduism is not a monolithic like Christianity or Islam and is basically an amalgamation of multitude of local beliefs. So one cannot have a Iranian style theocracy in this diverse and more populous land. Brahminism or the priesthood version of vedic religion is being projected as what Hinduism will metamorphosise into under a prolonged spell of BJP rule. But the critics fail to notice the broader caste base of the party cadre today and the anti caste stand of the parent organisation the RSS Moreover the RSS blame the lack of unity that was prevalent during the medieval period as the main reason for the ascend of Islamic forces. So BJP cannot be called conservative in terms of casteism , Moreover it is the least casteist political party in India ( if we look at the caste make up of the top leadership ) and it would rank second behind the BSP in Dalit participation. The failure to notice the difference between BJP and the other conservative entities in the West arises from the elite’s tendency to extrapolate western idioms into Indian reality. In Europe conservative parties are seen as the extension of the dominant church of that country , but India lacks a national church and the dominant religion lacks a theology. Take the movie which we started this post with – subh mangal zyada savdhan , In a western reality homosexuality is a sin and hence the conservatives would be up in arms ( The social reality in the West today cannot be equated with ours as it is more woke , so let’s take the reference point as the 1990s). But Hinduism is vague about sexual ideals and some of the puranic stories even endorse homosexuality. This has resulted in lesser opposition to the removal of article 377 or commercial release of movies with similar story lines. So the argument about BJP’s conservatism also falls apart.

Now comes the most important part – the economic one. All the right wing parties from the conservatives in UK to Republicans in the US are spokespersons of extreme capitalism and globalisation. BJP is an exception here too. Its main ideology is much closer to the left than even congress’s . The cold reception Jeff Bezos received in India shows the movement of BJP closer to the RSS dream of a self sufficient Bharat. In this respect one could see the adoration the BJP cadre has for China , which they yearn to simulate here. The capitalistic set up BJP yearn is also similar to the Chinese government controlled market place with more emphasis on MSME sector. Though the media celebrate the Modi – Ambani nexus , it totally ignores the impetus the government provides for startups and smaller industries. MSME sector is an extrapolation of Gandhian self sufficient Villages in the modern era , which the RSS endorses at great length. Hence it would be correct to call BJP a centre left party in the economic ecosystem.

This is what BJP is , it is a Nationalist Hindu party which is moderately conservative with a centre left ideology. Seeing this party through a western lense cannot help us explain its success or its ever consistent support among the masses.

The average Indian is a nationalist to the core ( Have anyone seen the number of reaction videos on YouTube by foreigners and the self appreciating Indian comments on those pages ) and Hindu ( they make up 80% of the population). The Hindus today are more proud of their heritage than they were 20 years ago thanks to the free flow of information ( or misinformation) through internet and sees no problem in asserting their right over their land. Indians are also sceptical of the elite especially the English speaking upper wafer thin crust who mock at every turn , the liberal culture is often associated with this group and as a counter reaction the masses gravitated towards the moderate conservatism of BJP. The liberal media have painted the anti CAA protests as a student revolt , but the reality is that the protests are limited to a few minority institutions and the left fortress of JNU. Most Indian students come under the category of silent majority that supports the ruling party and are happy with the actions of the government even the fatal shootings. Ordinary Indians also hate the old rich and their previleges , so Modi supporting a self made Ambani group ( thanks to the movie Guru ) is acceptable while a dynast like Rahul Bajaj preaching them sanity is anathema. Unlike the West where the “ordinary” people are the rural white collar folks , Indians come in all hues with the richest to the poorest United by nationalism. This group is inherently centre left due to their disdain for the rich from the license Raj era ( old money ). This brings me to my conclusion that it is not the BJP that moulds the people as the elite in the media wants us to believe but the people who see their projection in BJP or in short the success of BJP can be attributed to the rise of a Nationalistic Hindu populace with a centre left ideology.

VALLUVANAD IN MALABAR MANUAL

Malabar Manual by William Logan published in 1887 could be considered as the first treatise on Malabar by a Modern scholar . Though the book is intended as a manual to help future British officials to navigate the administrative complexities of the region with ease , It’s importance as a historical record of the period cannot be contested. As the British took up the administration of the region in 1792 they were confronted by the task of rebuilding a region utterly devastated by the Mysorean invasion and the British offensive. They started from the basics like repairing the roads (built by Hyder Ali and Tipu Sultan), connecting the region to the railway grid and most importantly reverting the administrative machinery back to the indegeneous system of amsams and desams from the persianised system of the invaders.

Valluvanad as we know today is a British creation. It comprises of ;

1. The core regions of erstwhile state of Valluvanad which comprises of the present day taluks of Perinthalmanna and Mannarkkad.

2. The peripheral region of Nedunganad including parts of Ottapalam and Pattambi taluks which were ruled separately by the Samuthiri . Nedunganad was an independent state for many years before being annexed by Vellatiri. The region never really came under the sway of the new rulers and was mostly autonomous.

3. The chiefdom of Kavalappara with its Muppil Nair was semi independent. It comprised of the regions around Shoranur and the ruler often shifted his allegiance between Samuthiri and the King of Kochi.

Now let us see what the Malabar Manual says about the region;

The first major reference to the region comes with the list of navigable roads in the region. It talks about a road broad enough to carry guns running from Tanur through thirunavaya , Tritala , Kavalappara and Lakkidi to Palakkad mentioned by Captain Johnson in 1796. This must be the Palakkad – Ottapalam – Pattambi road which now serves as the main artery of the region.

The second road to be mentioned is quiet fascinating one which is rarely used these days. It starts from Feroke , passes Venkadakkotta (Kottakkal) then on to Angadipuram and Cherpulassery finally terminating at Mannarkkad. This actually validates the antiquity of the Perinthalmanna – Kottakkal route and Cherpulassery – Mannarkkad road. This road also had an extension to Lakkidi from Cherpulassery which must be the Cherpulassery – Ottapalam road.

In the section relating to the geography of the region Logan talks about the Kalladikode ranges and the intensity of rains in the region , of Ananganmala near Cherpulassery and most importantly of the Ponnani river. I had always found the names Bharatapuzha and Nila to be artificial constructs hence to see Logan call the river Ponnani seems to vindicate my hunch ( though Perar is my preferred nomenclature ). The river as it is today was seasonal but it’s tributaries like Thoothapuzha is said to be perrenial.Valluvanad is said to be hilly with abundant paddy fields in the valleys between them. Arakurussi amsam was the largest in the whole of Malabar district and the wildlife of Attapady is described in great detail.

The history of Valluvanad is superficially touched upon with the Samuthiri’s partitioning of the nadu and the placement of a zamorin branch at Karimpuzha. It is the Mysorean invasion and the aftermath that is discussed in detail( may be highlight the British superiority) . It details the atrocities committed by invading forces on the Nairs including forced conversions and temple desicrations. What interested me more was the sectarianism that was prevelant at the time especially after the British conquest till the 1880s. Initially the foreigners were the targets of the Mappila insurgents but it soon turned against the Nairs. Though much of the incidents took place in the Eranad taluk , Valluvanad proper (Perinthalmanna) was a battle field. Though most of these attacks were tenant uprisings some of them were pure religious fanaticism. For example in Kunhippa Musaliyar of Thoota mosque ( currently in Malappuram) in 1872 took offence of the Komaram of the Velichapad (who supposedly insulted Islam) of Thootha Kavu on the other side of the river. Musaliyar crossed the river at night with some of his friends and killed the Velichapad. Kolathur was notorious for communal violence , even Thirumandham Kunnu temple was desicrated in 1849. It is a heartening thing to note that religious harmony was restored over the last 150 years and no traces of animosity remains today.

The British taluk of Valluvanad was headquartered at Perinthalmanna with a sub registrar office and a Deputy Tehsildar office at Cherpulassery ( Kacherikunnu).But over time Cherpulassery lost its place to Ottapalam. The initial importance of Cherpulassery might be due to its importance as the erstwhile capital of Nedunganad. Cherpulassery is listed as an important town in the book while Ottapalam, Pattambi and Shoranur are mentioned merely as market places or railway stations which is quiet strange in the modern sense. Other important towns are Angadipuram, Perinthalmanna, Karimpuzha, Mannarkkad and Vaniyamkulam.

Vaniyamkulam chanta is described as the largest fare in the region conducted on Thursdays with over 5000 in attendance. Here it must be noted that even Angadipuram Chanda would have 1500 attendees.There were chandas at Mankada, Kulattur, Thiruvegapura , Cherpulassery , Pattambi , Pattiripala , Ottapalam , Mannarkkad , Sreekrishnapuram and Alanallur. Other important fact is the use of cheruvannur for Shoranur, this might might only have changed in the 1900s which makes shornur the youngest of the major towns in Valluvanad.

Among festivals Thirumandam kunnu puram was the largest by far with 8000 people attending. The second comes the Mannarkad pooram with 4500 attendees and the third is a tie between koonathara Aryankavu puram and pariyanampatta puram with 3000 attendees. Other purams with over 1000 participants are Mulayankavu pooram, Muthassiyar Kavu Thalapolly , Mundakkottukurissi Cherumulayankavu puram ( Kayiliad ), Mulanjoor Bharani Vela , Chinakkattur puram, Chettallur pooram ,Thoota pooram, Cherampatta pooram , Elumbulassery Nallisery pooram and Karimbuzha utsavam. Cherpulassery Ayyappan Kavu utsavam is said to have an attendance of 2000 but there is no mention of Puthanalkkal pooram.

During the British rule roads expanded with Palakkad – Ponnani road and Palakkad – Kozhikode road being the most important. There is mention of a roads originating from Pattambi railway station to Nilambur , Kuttanad , Cherpulassery and Thritala. Railway stations at Ottapalam, Lakkidi, Cheruvannur , Pattambi are mentioned.

Though the book talks more about Kozhikode and Kannur , the smaller bits here and there about Valluvanad is quiet helpful in building the history of the region especially of the 18th and 19th century. It is a sad fact that our local history is never studied with vigour or is taught to us , it is high time that regional histories be brought to the forefront or some of the local knowledge will be lost for ever.

THE DONKEY NATION

India is a blemish on the face of this planet. How much i wish this ignorant mass of worthless souls be cast into the abyss of outer space. We don’t deserve democracy nor we deserve this facade of equality. The unending streams of invaders were right in conquering us as this worthless sea of humanity could be nothing more than a slave brigade.

Why should we be given the right to elect our leaders when we never learn from our mistakes?. We as a herd could easily be manipulated by political dimwits with their tacky punchlines of “Mandir ” ,”Garibi” or “Mathil” over and over again. Even after 70 years of existence we could never look past the sacred thread of caste , churning out diktats against intercaste marriages with lethal impunity , all the while hiding under the mask of benovelance. This nation of donkeys should never be called a “paradox” or an “Aberration” , it should instead be called an absurdity which should never be celebrated.

Hinduism must have met the fate of its contemporaries in Rome , Greece or the Andes where a fractured society ruled by the elites was overthrown by faiths which preached equality. I envy Indonesians who escaped its clutches and became a true egalitarian state. This billion caste worshippers could never create a true Nation state or wield power of any stature . So you stupid optimist stop dreaming of a future for this nation of miserables. Let it sink into the ocean for good.

NEDUNGANAD OR VALLUVANAD

Every time the bus crosses the river from Malappuram to Palakkad at Thootha I used to wonder why this river became the demarcation line between the two regions which were once part of the same taluk named valluvanad. yes there were some subtle differences  between the areas north and south of the river , mainly the demographics , but that never solved the puzzle. That is when I stumbled up on Mr. S. Rajendu’s “Nedunganad Charitram”.

Erstwhile Nedunganad once extended from the kalladikkodan hills in the east to the Arabian sea in the west with its core lying between the thoothapuzha and Bharatapuzha. Its rulers were quiet weak resulting in parts west of Bharatapuzha being lost permanently to Eralpad by the 13th century . The Valluvakonathiri to the north always had an eye on this fertile region of which certain parts were annexed by him in the 15th century. According to Rajendu sir’s research the present day taluks of pattambi and Ottapalam remained independent of valluvanadan rule till the Mysore invasion of the 18th century. This might be the reason why this region was spared of the atrocities Tippu committed in other parts of southern Malabar. Nedunganad lost its identity forever when it was merged with Valluvanad taluk in 1860.

Ottapalam , Cherpulassery , pattambi and Shornur are your quintessential Valluvnadan areas . Under the light of newer findings could the region be called Valluvanad at all?. Should it be called Nedunganad instead?  . share your opinion in the comment section.

Here is the link to Rajendu sir’s site

http://nedunganad.blogspot.com/

VELICHAPPAD

One of the remnants of the pre vedic malayali heritage is the institution of Velichappad. Here in Valluvanad with its numerous Devi temples and Kavus (Sacred grooves) velichappads are ever more important to the spiritual ecosystem than anywhere else in the state . This post is about the only Velichappad i know and how he brought the Devi of our temple to life every night during the Chuttuvilakku ( an occasion when lamps are lit around the kavu premises).

Velichappads get initiated to serve the Goddess of the land on self will . It is said that the goddess would choose her representative by sending certain specific omens to him . In case of Bhaskaran Velichappad it was the Devi appearing in his dream to invite him to serve her . Our velichappad is something of an anomaly , He was born into a very wealthy Nair Tharavad and had spent most of his childhood in Rangoon. His uncle had a very good library with best books of the time , while his cousins were white collared professionals. My early memories of him are very vague , It was during mid 1990s that we moved here from Cherpulassery , so he must have been the velichappad of the Desam from the early 90s. The first thing that comes to my mind are his long locks and the sword (vaal in malayalam) which he carried with him . Once a year we would have our turn to host the chuttuvilakku and that is when I saw his fury.

In kavus like ours the vellichapad also doubles up as the temple priest , so on the evening of chuttuvilakku he would first do the regular offerings to the Devi while we lit the lamps. After the lamps are lit and the sun has set , he accompanied with an assistant would go to the temple pond to bathe and this is when his transformation into the goddess starts. He would first discard his normal clothes to wear the red pattu ( silk) , which is the color of the goddess and wear the Devi’s anklet . As he return , the ambience would have been set for his performance thanks to highly energizing percussion by the melam ( Kerala chenda performance) . The out of the world experience would be exemplified by the starry sky of the makara month ( Malayalam calendar)  and the rustling of the banyan leaves swaying in the light wind . He would first enter the kavu , take the blessing from the Devi and then pick up his sword to circumambulate the premise thrice , stopping at all the four corners to communicate with the goddess so as to make his transformation into the Devi less turbulent.

Once the Devi possess him , he would run violently like the Bhadra kali around the kavu proclaiming her utterances to everyone and blessing them. It is an extraordinary sight to watch him move about trembling in fury of the great spirit. At the end he would take a coconut and smash it over a granite carved like a snake , dissipating all our sins. Over the next hour the Velichappad would return back to him human spirit and he would place the red dress and the anklet as an offering to the mother goddess.

sadly we don’t have a desam(region) velichappad today as Bhaskaran Velichappad passed away a few years back . It is only during the pooram that we have a velichappad , who in most cases would be brought from our rival desams.

VALLUVANAD FLYING HIGH

Though I am a bit late in posting the good news , the Angadipuram Railway over bridge is now a reality . I still remember those days when a train on the Shornur – Nilambur line used to bring chaos to NH 213 (Palakkad – Kozhikode ) with traffic jams at times extending till Perinthalmanna . But now we have a four lane road and an overbridge to ease the congestion . The person to be thanked is the Perinthalmanna MLA Mr.Manjalamkuzhi Ali for his sheer determination in making the project a reality.

Angadipuram_Junction-Perithelmanna
THEN
Thrissur_1_Regi_KI_2766438e
NOW

The other infrastructural projects that need immediate attention in Valluvanad are :

  1. A bye pass road and a new bridge over kunthi puzha at Mannarkad.
  2. Roads to bye pass the congestion at Ottapalam and Pattambi on the Palakkad – Guruvayur road and a railway overbridge at vadanamkurussi.
  3. More buses between Mannarkad and shornur , which is the gateway to the region.
  4. A new bridge over Bharatapuzha at Pattambi.
  5. Revitalisation of Bharatapuzha station at Shornur so that the region could acess trains passing through the link line togather with the modernisation of Shornur Railway Station.
  6. Ksrtc depots at ottapalam and pattambi with sub depots at cherpulassery and shornur.

Let us hope that with the defense park at Ottapalam and the Angadipuram overbridge  valluvanad would leap forward into a brighter future.

MAYILVAHANAM

Mayilvahanam buses brings nostalgia to the hearts of every valluvanadan  .Those buses with  green , blue , red and white livery were the only ones we knew , they literally connected valluvanadan heartland with the outside world . Today as they wind up their historic journey , this is my ode to what we proudly call “our KSRTC”….

Being born in 1989 my Mayilvahanam experience started much later compared to many of my readers . My mother used to go to college in a CTS which she reminisces quiet often and the strange part is that she still remembers the names of conductors and drivers of those “circular” buses . As other means of transport were rare those employees held an important place in their lives as they took them to their destinations safe and on time. My first memories of those buses were when i used to go to my maternal home in the “Ennapadam” bus from Cherpulassery to Shornur . It was a blue / green bus that ran from Mannarkad to Thrissur and would usually be  full when we board , more people used to get in as we passed through the many stops making it tilt towards either sides violently owing to the weight  as we sped through many a narrow lanes.  Then came my school days when my mother and I used to take our morning and evening “Velichapad – Valanchery” .  It was again a blue/green bus from Ottapalam to Valanchery via Cherpulassery and pattambi . The name Velichapad was the pseudonym of its driver who according to my mother was short tempered like a valluvanadan Velichapad . If we did not get our regular bus the next was a red/white Palakkad – Guruvayur one which was so jam packed that i still have nightmares about my journeys in it. As years passed these many Mayilvahanams became part of my life . The Palakkad – Guruvayur route was their bastion , so were the many routes connecting all the major Valluvanadan towns like Cherpulassery , Ottapalam , Shornur , Pattambi ,Perinthalmanna , Mannarkad and Valanchery.  The Kozhikode buses were legendary whether it be Walayar, Kollengode or Mangalam dam , and there was the Shornur – Anakatty bus that passed Pattambi early in the morning. The strange thing is that most of these buses started from the small discreet border towns along the Kerala – Tamil nadu border like Gopalapuram or Meenakshipuram and went to Guruvayur.

Each brand of Mayilvahanam buses had their workshops at Shornur . I still remember the bus bodies being built inside those sheds with spare buses waiting for maintenance  spilling on to the main road . Like KSRTC they used to have checkers .During my college days (2010s) , he used to board the Kozhikode – Vadakenchery bus from Thootha on random days and check the tickets from the conductors ticket book . There  were spare buses and it was common for the passengers to be ferried into the spare bus at Kulappully if the main bus experienced any trouble.

As of 2017 there are only a handful of Mayilvahanams left and myself being a Mayilvahanam fan like any other Valluvanadan would deeply miss our Vahanams.

 

 

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VALLUVANAD HELP DESK

The search terms directed to my site are usually not related to any of my posts . They usually are queries about getting around Valluvanad ….. here are the answers for many of the frequently asked questions :

1. Ottapalam to Mannarkad buses

There are regular private buses in this route via Ambalapara -Thiruvazhiyode- Sreekrishnapuram or Cherpulassery-Thiruvazhiyode-Sreekrishnapuram .

2.Perinthalmanna – Palakkad early morning buses

There are round the clock KSRTC buses in this route , while private buses to my knowledge start running by 5 am

3.Reasons for backwardness of Palakkad

Its huge size , tribal population and lesser diversity in political representation (it is a CPM stronghold)

5. Cherpulassery airport –

The nearest is Calicut International airport app…60 km to north west.

6. Train timings from Angadipuram to Pattambi –

There are no direct trains  , but you could get down at Vadanamkurussi (en route Shornur ) and board a Pattambi or Guruvayur bus.

7. Chelakkara –

Though culturally similar to Valluvanad it was a part of the Kingdom of Cochin and now falls under Thalappily taluk of Thrissur district . There are no direct buses to Calicut from here . you will have to first get to ottapalam then to perinthalmanna from where there are regular buses to Calicut. There are regular train services to Calicut  from Shornur which is 13 km from Chelakkara.

8.Shornur to Palakkad bus –

There are only a few direct buses in this route . you will have to first get to Kulapully , which is the second private bus stand of Shornur , 2 km from the Railway station and  then get a palakkad bus , which are quiet frequent.

9.Hotels at Cherpulassery –

There are quiet a few , one of the star hotels is Mithilla Regency.

10. Cherpulassey – Palakkad route buses –

This is route with private buses at regular intervals with a few KSRTC buses in between via kongad.

11. Distance between cherpulassery and calicut –

85 kms .there are a few private buses  and a handful of Ksrtc buses.

12.Bakeries at Shornur –

Shornur actually is a small town , there are Nila bake houses at Kulapully and Cheruthurutty.

13. Valluvanad and Tippu –

The relation is a bit complicated.

14.Angadipuram to Palakkad train –

why ?? there are buses both Ksrtc and private every 5 minutes. If it is of utmost necessity you could get Palakkad trains from Shornur.

15.Shornur to Ooty –

First get to pattambi/cherpulassery , then to perinthalmanna – nilambur – gudallur – ooty.

16. Cherpulassey to  Mannarkkad –

The distance is about 25 kms. there are regular buses.

17. Jewellers at Shornur –

No major jewellery chains here… Thrissur is just 45 minutes away.

18. Why is shornur junction so congested with trains ? –

It is here that the main railway route in Kerala split in four directions …..to calicut , thrissur,palakkad and nilambur.

19.Cherpulassery CBSE school –

The major one is the Sabari central school.

20. Angadipuram to Kadambuzha –

There are both private and ksrtc buses to valanchery from here , then proceed to Kadambuzha,

21. Hospitals at cherpulassery –

Kerala medical college hospital ,Cooperative hospital,Shankar hospital.

22. Cherpulassey nearest railway station –

Vallapuzha , The nearest major station is Shornur , 17 km to south.

23. Buses from Shornur to Calicut –

None – train is better – Else get to Pattambi then Valanchery , from where there are direct buses to  calicut.

24. Perinthalmanna old bus stand –

It is a shopping complex now….sorry.

25.Pambin kavu –

It is a sacred groove commonly found in this region , which is thick with foliage and is considered to house serpent (gods).

26. Chirayath bus –

They have nearly many buses in the Thrissur- Ottapalam route , with a few running longer trips to cherpulassery , mannarkad and palakkad.

27. Cherpulassery – Ottapalam –

17 kms , regular private buses ply on this route.

28. Shornur to Attapadi –

nearly 80 km – There is one bus early in the morning formerly a  mayilvahanam now kavitha. otherwise get to Cherpulassry from where there are regular buses to Mannarkad and thence to Anakkaty. There are a few shornur – mannarkad direct buses too.

29.Ottapalam to Edappal –

Take a bus to Pattambi(Guruvayur limited stop) , then change over to an Edappal bus , which are frequent via kootanad or thrithala.

30.Perintalmanna – Cherpulassery –

17km , buses every 5 minute from the pattambi road junction or moulana hospital junction.

31. Calicut to Ottapalam bus timings – there are 3 buses from Calicut Bus stand  between 1 and 2 : 30 pm .

33. Angadipuram over bridge – YES…its reality now.

34 . wadakkanchery over bridge – yes , finally.

35 . Shankar hospital , Cherpulassery – It is right next to the bus stand on the pattambi road.

GETTING AROUND VALLUVANAD

Much of the search terms directed at my site are often about getting around the Valluvanad region. This article tries to answer some of those queries…

The largest town by size in the region is Perinthalmanna ; which lies on the Palakkad – Kozhikode National highway . You could get there by train via the Nilambur line from Shornur , getting down at the Angadipuram Railway station. Perinthalmanna is well connected by road to almost all the major towns of Palakkad and Malappuram Districts.  There are limited stop private buses and KSRTC Town to Town buses to Palakkad( via Mannarkad) and Kozhikode (via Malappuram) every few minutes on NH 966 . KSRTC buses to at intervals of 20 to 30 minutes connect Perinthalmanna to Thrissur. Private local buses ply at frequent intervals to Manjeri, Malappuram, Nilambur, Melattur – Karuvarakundu, Alanallur, Mannarkad , Valanchery , Kottakal ,Cherpulassery and Pattambi.There are 2 private bus stands and a KSRTC bus stand here but private buses usually bye pass them. you could get Palakkad or Mannarkad buses from near the police station ; Calicut , Nilambur,Melatur,Manjeri, Valanchery and Kottakal buses from the bus stop near KMT silks ; Pattambi and Cherpulassery buses from the bus stop near Moulana hospital. Shornur could be reached either by taking a Pattambi or Cherpulassery bus from where there are buses to Shornur .

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Ottapalam , the cultural capital of Valluvanad lies on the Kulapully – Palakkad state highway. There is a private bus stand from where you could get both private and KSRTC buses. Ksrtc buses are are mostly the ones on Palakkad- Guruvayur route. There are  private buses to Thrissur (via shornur) ; Palakkad ; Guruvayur (via Pattambi) ; Thiruvillwamala ; Mayannur ;Mannarkad and Cherpulassery . There are a few fast passenger buses in the morning to Calicut. The Ottapalam railway station falls on the Shornur – Palakkad line . Only a few express trains halt here and the nearest major railway station is the Shornur Junction station .

Pattambi lies to the west of Ottapalam and Shoranur on the Palakkad – Guruvayur route. there is a Private bus stand and a ksrtc bus stand here . Like Ottapalam KSRTC buses are few and most of them ply on the Palakkad – Guruvayur or Perinthalmanna – Thrissur route. There are private buses to Shornur, Palakkad (via ottapalam),Guruvayur (via kunnamkulam), Cherpulassery, Perinthalmanna,  Valanchery, Ponnani (via edappal)  and Pallipuram. There is a railway station at Pattambi , lying on the Shornur – Calicut line , But only a few long distance trains have halts here . The nearest major railway station is Shoranur Junction.

Shornur is the railway gateway to Valluvand. There are regular trains to most places in India from here. Sadly Shornur is poorly connected by bus to rest of the region. you could get buses to Thrissur and Ottapalam from the railway station. Shornur bus stand caters to Cherpulassery , Pattambi and Chelakkara buses . For buses to Palakkad you would have to take the Ottapalam bus from the railway station and get down at Kulapully  (2 Kms from the station) which falls on the Palakkad Guruvayur route. Buses to Perinthalmanna are rare and the best option is to take the Pattambi bus and then board a Perinthalmanna bus from there.

Cherpulassery is equidistant from Pattambi , Ottapalam , Perinthalmanna and Shornur. The place is well connected to these places by private buses . Cherpulassery private bus stand also caters to palakkad and mannarkad buses. The nearest railway station is Shornur Junction.

Mannarkad is the farthest away from  any other major Valluvanadan town. It falls on NH966 between Perinthalmanna and Palakkad. There is a KSRTC bus stand and a private bus stand  here . The town is well connected to Palakkad and Kozhikode  by regular town to town KSRTC buses and private Limited stop buses. Private bus services connect Mannarkad to Agali (Anakatty), Melattur,Perinthalmanna,Cherpulassery,Palakkad and Ottapalam. The nearest railway station is Palakkad Junction railway station.

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